Cristina Lucas

Subjects in mirror are closer than they appear

Cristina_Lucas_8@Albarran-Bourdais,
Cristina_Lucas_5@Albarran-Bourdais,
Cristina_Lucas_7@Albarran-Bourdais,
Cristina_Lucas_2@Albarran-Bourdais,
Cristina_Lucas_3@Albarran-Bourdais,

Despite readily assuming there are no absolute truths, we perceive facts with a degree of relativism within the hypercomplexity of the present moment that are more than intuition, verifiable data.

 

Thus determined by a global, ecological horizon, immersed in a process that draws us into a synchronous world of capital, in the global free market, not only of things but of information, we are faced with the idea that the “progress” of modernity is no longer viable in light of imminent ecological, social, and economic disasters, as Bruno Latour unequivocally asserts in We Have Never Been Modern.

 

Facing the extinction of a world with no future, the default response seems to be Nihilism. It is at that precise moment when science, politics, and economics must be applied unconditionally to recover the link with Earth. This involves the Copernican Revolution—that is hopefully possible—of recognising humans as part, not rulers, of the planet. 

 

In art, it is not only possible, but essential to address the issues that weigh on us, that are closer and more pressing than we can grasp.

See previous exhibition